Odeon Weston-super-Mare Odeon Exeter Odeon York

West's Picture Palace

Guildford's first cinema opened in the Constitutional Hall in 1909. The building later served as a second-hand bookshop and now sells furniture.

West's Picture Palace, Guildford 2006 - exterior
West's Picture Palace, Guildford 2006 - BFI centenary plaque

Cannon Guildford

The former Cannon Guildford became a nightclub in the 1990s. At the time of last visit in November 2006, it was standing empty awaiting demolition to make way for the Friary Centre development.

Cannon Guildford 2006 - exterior
Cannon Guildford 2006 - exterior (night)

Reel Cinemas York

The Odeon York opened on 1st February 1937 with a single screen seating 1,484. It was tripled in 1972, more sensitively than Odeon often managed but in the usual Odeon pattern, with one large screen in an extended circle and two much smaller screens below.

Odeon York 2006 - exterior
Odeon York 2006 - exterior
Odeon York 2006 - exterior (detail including sign)
Odeon York 2006 - exterior (detail including sign)
Odeon York 2006 - exterior (detail showing rounded corner and original logo)
Odeon York 2006 - exterior (detail showing rounded corner and original logo)
Odeon York 2006 - exterior (rear)
Odeon York 2006 - exterior (rear)
Odeon York 2006 - exterior (rear)

Odeon Weston-super-Mare

Weston-super-Mare's Odeon cinema, designed by Thomas Cecil Howitt, is a stunning landmark building in a starkly beautiful modernist style with a tower typical of vintage Odeon buildings, tiled in a striking cream faiance. Opened in 1935, it was tripled in 1973 in the usual Odeon style (main screen in circle and front stalls; two smaller screens beneath the circle). A fourth screen was added in 1991 by splitting screen 1, achieved by dropping a new wall at the front of the circle; the original proscenium and front stalls (and gents toilets!) are therefore still in use.

Odeon Weston-super-Mare 2006 - exterior
Odeon Weston-super-Mare 2006 - exterior
Odeon Weston-super-Mare 2006 - exterior (detail)

Odeon Salisbury

Surely one of the most remarkable and outright spectacular cinemas in the country, the Odeon Salisbury shows both what can be achieved in cinema design and what twenty-first century audiences are missing in their modern picture palaces.

Odeon Salisbury 2006 - exterior (front)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - exterior (front)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - exterior (front detail)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - exterior (front detail)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - interior - original ticket hall and box office, now disused
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - exterior (rear)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - exterior (rear detail)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - exterior (rear detail)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - interior (current ticket hall and box office)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - interior (current ticket hall and box office)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - interior (current ticket hall and box office)
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - historical information displayed in ticket hall, dated 1931 and signed by the architect William Trent
Odeon Salisbury 2006 - plaque presented by Rank Leisure Services

Everyman Oxted

The mock-Tudor Plaza opened in 1929 and was modified to include a circle in 1936. The capacity was reduced from 600 to 440 with the introduction of CinemaScope, as the new screen had to be built in front of the proscenium.

Everyman Oxted 2006 - front
Everyman Oxted 2006 - front

Cannon Gloucester

The Regal cinema (later the ABC Regal, and then the Cannon) was the last of Gloucester's picture palaces and sits in a prime location in Gloucester's King's Square. Modified for theatrical and concert use and then later tripled by EMI, it ceased to be commercially viable in 1988.

Cannon (ABC Regal) Gloucester 2004 - front

Odeon Gloucester

The Gloucester Odeon was the surviving half of a Rank-owned double-act in Eastgate Street; during rationalisation in 1961, the nearby Gaumont (formerly the Hippodrome) was closed down and demolished three years later. Starting off life in 1935 as the Plaza, owned by the Poole circuit (which explains the lack of the distinctive Odeon architectural features) the cinema itself was so commercially disastrous by the 1970s that rather than triple it (or make it seven-way, as in nearby Cheltenham), Rank applied to turn it into a bingo hall, which it remains today.

Odeon Gloucester 2006 - front
Odeon Gloucester 2006 - front
Odeon Gloucester 2006 - front

Odeon Exeter

The Odeon Exeter opened on 30th August 1937, seating 1,900. In 1942, it suffered minor bomb damage in a raid that destroyed much of central Exeter, but was later repaired and restored. The cinema was tripled in 1972 in the standard Odeon pattern (main screen in circle / disused front stalls; smaller screens beneath the circle). Like the Odeon Weston-super-Mare, a fourth screen was added in the former front stalls in 1988.

Odeon Exeter 2006 - front and side
Odeon Exeter 2006 - front
Odeon Exeter 2006 - front and side

The Daffodil

A subsequent conversion to a restaurant has preserved the beautiful Art Deco-style Daffodil cinema in magnificent condition, complete with barrel-vaulted ceiling, balcony and proscenium. A photograph of the auditorium in its original form hangs in the foyer but really no imagination at all is required to picture it in its heyday. (See The Daffodil restaurant website for contemporary interior photographs.)

The Daffodil, Cheltenham 2006 - front
The Daffodil, Cheltenham 2006 - front
The Daffodil, Cheltenham 2006 - front (night)

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